Special needs child ‘Baker acted out’ due to disruptive behavior at school, parents say

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Two Florida parents are outraged after claiming their son was handcuffed and committed against his will to a mental health facility. According to First Coast News, the ordeal took place under Florida’s Baker Law, which permits the involuntary admission of people for treatment, even children. Parents Elizabeth Mcgill and Antonio Davis say they are now seeking legal action. -Jonah’s one-year-old son made threatening comments and threw himself at a resource officer last week at Seaside Charter School in San Jose. When Jonah’s father went to pick up the boy, he was told that Jonah had been taken to a facility under the Baker Act. “He fell asleep in the police car because he’s so small, he didn’t take a nap, with the handcuffs on,” Mcgill said. “He cried every night. When we talked to him on the phone, he was like, ‘Mom, when you take me out, mum.’ And we couldn’t, we kept saying ‘we’re trying, mate.’ “Jonah spent three nights alone at the facility and his parents say he was traumatized. Under the Baker law, a person can be involuntarily committed for a mental health evaluation for up to 72 hours. They can be implemented if a police officer, judge, doctor or mental health official believes that the person has a mental illness and poses a short-term danger to themselves or others. Jonah’s parents say the appropriate criteria were not met in the boy’s case as the most appropriate facility for the child,” said Shannon Schott, a partner at Plata Schott Law. The school declined to comment. in addition to pointing out that law enforcement, not the school, is enforcing the Baker Law. McGill said she fears the same thing will happen to her son or other children again.” Jonah is a very nice little boy, he has ADHD, so he is a bit hyperactive, and he has a few behavioral issues, but at the end of the day, he’s just a nice, loving boy,” she said. First Coast News contacted the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office, but had not heard back at the time of reporting.

Two Florida parents are outraged after claiming their son was handcuffed and committed against his will to a mental health facility.

According to First Coast Newsthe ordeal was held under Florida’s Baker Law, which permits the involuntary admission of people for treatment, even children.

Parents Elizabeth Mcgill and Antonio Davis say they are now seeking legal action.

Mcgill said he was told his 6-year-old son, Jonah, made threatening comments and threw himself at a resource officer last week at Seaside Charter School in San Jose.

When Jonah’s father went to pick up the boy, he was told that Jonah had been taken to a facility under the Baker Law.

“He fell asleep in the police car because he’s so small, he didn’t take a nap, with the handcuffs on,” Mcgill said. “He cried every night. When we talked to him on the phone, he was like, ‘Mom, when you take me out, mum.’ And we couldn’t, we kept saying “we’re trying, mate”.

Jonah spent three nights alone at the facility and his parents say he was traumatized.

Under the Baker Law, a person can be involuntarily committed for a mental health assessment for up to 72 hours. It can be implemented if a police officer, judge, doctor or mental health official believes that the person has a mental illness and poses a short-term danger to themselves or others.

A lawyer for Jonah’s parents said the proper criteria were not met in the boy’s case.

“The school continually told my clients that there was only one option, that their child was to be involuntarily committed to this particular facility, which we felt was not the most appropriate facility. for the kid,” Plata’s partner Shannon Schott said. Schott law.

The school declined to comment other than to point out that law enforcement, not the school, is enforcing the Baker Law.

Mcgill said she was afraid the same thing would happen to her son or other children.

“Jonah is a very nice little boy, he has ADHD so he’s a bit hyper, and he has a few behavioral issues, but at the end of the day, he’s just a nice, loving boy,” she said. declared.

First Coast News contacted the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office, but had not heard back at the time of reporting.

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